Analysis of Daffodils by William Wordsworth

Wandered Lonely as a Cloud’ Poem William Wordsworth wrote Daffodils on a stormy day in spring, while walking along with his sister Dorothy near Ullswater Lake, in England. He imagined that the daffodils were dancing and invoking him to join and enjoy the breezy nature of the fields. Dorothy Wordsworth, the younger sister of William Wordsworth, found the poem so interesting that she took ‘Daffodils’ as the subject for her journal. The poem contains six lines in four stanzas, as an appreciation of daffodils. Analysis of Daffodils I wander’d lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vale and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils: Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Rhyming Scheme The ‘Daffodils’ has a rhyming scheme throughout the poem. The rhyming scheme of the above stanza is ABAB ( A – cloud and crowd; B – hills and daffodils) and ending with a rhyming couplet CC (C – trees and breeze). The above stanza makes use of ‘Enjambment’ which converts the poem into a continuous flow of expressions without a pause. Figures of Speech Used in the Poem I wander’d lonely as a cloud – The first line makes nice use of personification and simile.

The poet assumes himself to be a cloud (simile) floating in the sky. When Wordsworth says in the second line ‘I’ (poet as a cloud) look down at the valleys and mountains and appreciate the daffodils; it’s the personification, where an inanimate object (cloud) possesses the quality of a human enabling it to see the daffodils. The line “Ten thousand saw I at a glance” is an exaggeration and a hyperbole, describing the scene of ten thousand daffodils, all together. Alliteration is the repetition of similar sounds, is applied for the word ‘h’, in the words – high and hills. Title and Theme of the Poem

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Imagery The poem paints images of lakes, fields, trees, stars in Ullswater. Wordsworth continuously praises the daffodils, comparing them to the Milky Way galaxy (in the second stanza), their dance (in the third stanza) and in the concluding stanza, dreams to join the daffodils in their dance. The poem uses descriptive language throughout the stanzas. The poet cannot resist himself from participating in the dance of the daffodils. The wording is simple and melodious. Isn’t Daffodils, a great gift idea of William Wordsworth that celebrates happiness of nature amongst .

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