APUSH Unit 3 Practice Test

APUSH Unit 3 Practice Test

1. The Founding Fathers failed to eliminate slavery because
A) they did not truly believe in democracy.
B) a fight over slavery might destroy national unity.
C) they were more concerned with securing equality for women.
D) the North, as its industry expanded, began to rely more heavily on slave labor.
E) economic conditions would not allow such a loss.
B
2. One reason that the United States avoided the frightful excesses of the French Revolution is
that
A) America declared martial law until the Constitution was enacted in 1789.
B) the American Revolution suddenly overturned the entire political framework.
C) cheap land was easily available.
D) political democracy preceded economic democracy.
E) a strong sense of class consciousness already existed.
C
3. The Articles of Confederation left Congress unable to
A) organize development of the western lands.
B) deal with foreign affairs.
C) apportion state representation equally.
D) enforce a tax collection program.
E) establish a postal service.
D
4. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787
A) provided for the survey and sale of public lands in the Old Northwest.
B) established a procedure for governing the Old Northwest territory.
C) banned slavery from all territories of the United States.
D) cleared the way for ratification of the Articles of Confederation.
E) gave control over land to the territories in which they were located.
B
5. Match each nation on the left with the correct description of the problem it presented for
U.S. foreign relations following the Revolutionary War.
A. Britain 1. threatened American commerce in the Mediterranean
B. France 2. demanded repayment of wartime loans
C. Spain 3. occupied a chain of trading forts in the Old Northwest
D. Barbary Coast 4. controlled important trade routes from the interior of North America
A) A-1, B-3, C-2, D-4
B) A-2, B-4, C-1, D-3
C) A-2, B-2, C-3, D-4
D) A-3, B-2, C-4, D-1
E) A-4, B-2, C-1, D-3
D
6. Shays’s Rebellion was provoked by
A) fear that the Articles of Confederation had created too strong a national government for
the United States.
B) efforts by wealthy merchants to replace the Articles of Confederation with a new
constitution.
C) a quarrel over the boundary between Massachusetts and Vermont.
D) foreclosures on the mortgages of backcountry farmers.
E) the government’s failure to pay bonuses to Revolutionary War veterans.
D
7. Most of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention could best be labeled
A) states’ rightists.
B) antifederalists.
C) nationalists.
D) ordinary citizens.
E) counter revolutionaries.
C
8. Which of the following is a compromise in the Constitution?
A) counting all slaves in apportioning membership in the House
B) continuation of the foreign slave trade
C) direct election of the president
D) control of interstate commerce by the national government
E) prohibiting states from abolishing slave trade
B
9. The antifederalist camp included all of the following groups except
A) supporters of a strong central authority.
B) states’ rights supporters.
C) backcountry dwellers.
D) paper money advocates.
E) debtors.
A
10. Among other views, The Federalist, written during the ratification debate, argued that it was
A) impossible to safeguard the rights of states from the power of a strong central
government.
B) possible to extend a republican form of government over a large territory.
C) inevitable that slavery would be abolished in the new republic.
D) illegal to replace the Articles of Confederation with a new constitution.
E) best to establish a direct democracy.
B
11. Match the individual with his office in the new government.
A. Thomas Jefferson 1. attorney general
B. Alexander Hamilton 2. secretary of state
C. Henry Knox 3. secretary of war
4. secretary of treasury
A) A-1, B-3, C-2
B) A-3, B-1, C-4
C) A-2, B-4, C-3
D) A-4, B-2, C-l
E) A-1, B-4, C-3
C
12. All of the following are guarantees provided by the Bill of Rights except
A) the right to vote for all citizens.
B) freedom of speech.
C) freedom of religion.
D) freedom of the press.
E) right to a trial by a jury.
A
13. Alexander Hamilton’s financial program for the economic development of the United States
favored
A) agricultural interests.
B) trade with France.
C) the wealthier class.
D) the poor.
E) the middle class.
C
14. Match each political leader with his positions on public policy in the 1790s.
A. Hamilton 1. privileges for the upper classes
B. Jefferson 2. pro-British
3. sympathy for the common people
4. potent central government
5. pay off the national debt
6. government support for business
7. pro-French
8. universal education
A) A-1, 2, 4, 6—B-3, 5, 7, 8
B) A-1, 5, 6, 7—B-2, 3, 4, 8
C) A-2, 3, 5, 8—B-1, 4, 6, 7
D) A-3, 6, 7, 8—B-1, 2, 4, 5
E) A-5, 2, 6, 3—B-1, 4, 7, 8
A
15. Washington’s Neutrality Proclamation of 1793
A) was based on calculations of American selfinterest.
B) fulfilled America’s obligations under the Franco American Treaty.
C) was opposed by both Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson.
D) dealt a severe blow to French military and naval strategists.
E) had little impact on future American foreign policy.
A
16. Arrange the following events in chronological order: (A) XYZ affair, (B) Neutrality
Proclamation, (C) Jay’s Treaty, (D) Kentucky and Virginia resolutions.
A) C, B, A, D
B) B, A, C, D
C) B, C, A, D
D) C, B, D, A
E) A, B, D, C
C
17. In Jay’s Treaty, the British
A) pledged to stop seizing American ships.
B) released Americans from their pre-Revolutionary War debt obligations to British
merchants.
C) promised to evacuate the chain of forts in the Old Northwest.
D) refused to pay damages for seizures of American ships.
E) were denied most favored nation status.
C
18. The main purpose of the Alien and Sedition Acts was to
A) capture French and British spies.
B) control the Federalists.
C) silence and punish critics of the Federalists.
D) keep Thomas Jefferson from becoming president.
E) provide support for the Democratic Republican party.
C
19. The Virginia and Kentucky resolutions were written in response to
A) the XYZ affair.
B) Thomas Jefferson’s presidential candidacy in 1800.
C) the Alien and Sedition Acts.
D) the compact theory of government.
E) the Federalist papers.
C
20. Jeffersonians believed in all of the following except
A) opposition to a national debt.
B) agriculture as the ideal occupation.
C) every adult white male’s right to vote.
D) freedom of speech.
E) central authority should be kept to a minimum.
C
21. Thomas Jefferson’s “Revolution of 1800” was remarkable in that it
A) moved the United States away from its democratic ideals.
B) marked the peaceful and orderly transfer of power on the basis of election results
accepted by all parties.
C) occurred after he left the presidency.
D) caused America to do what the British had been doing for a generation regarding the
election of a legislative body.
E) was in no way a revolution.
B
22. With Thomas Jefferson’s election as president, the Democratic-Republican party
A) grew stronger and more unified.
B) removed many Federalists from government jobs.
C) soon resented its leaders’ lavish life-style.
D) grew less unified as the Federalist party began to fade and lose power.
E) sought to extend the Alien and Sedition Acts to punish their enemies.
D
23. The chief justice who carried out, more than any other federal official, the ideas of
Alexander Hamilton concerning a powerful federal government was
A) James Madison.
B) William Marbury.
C) John Marshall.
D) Samuel Chase.
E) John Jay.
C
24. The case of Marbury v. Madison involved the question of who had the right to
A) commit the United States to entangling alliances.
B) impeach federal officers for “high crimes and misdemeanors.”
C) declare an act of Congress unconstitutional.
D) purchase foreign territory for the United States.
E) appoint Supreme Court justices.
C
25. In order to purchase New Orleans from France, Thomas Jefferson
A) threatened to form an alliance with France’s enemy, Spain.
B) was unwilling to go to war.
C) proposed to break away from all alliances to prove our neutrality.
D) was willing to use funds from private individuals if Congress would not authorize
enough money for the purchase.
E) decided to make an alliance with his old enemy, Britain.
E
26. Lewis and Clark demonstrated the viability of
A) travel across the isthmus of Panama.
B) an overland trail to the Pacific.
C) settlement in the southern portion of the Louisiana territory.
D) using Indian guides.
E) all of the above.
B
27. To deal with British and French violations of America’s neutrality, Thomas Jefferson
A) declared war on Britain.
B) enacted an economic embargo.
C) declared war on France.
D) did nothing.
E) sought trade relations with Spain and Holland.
B
28. President James Madison made a major foreign-policy mistake when he
A) accepted Napoleon’s promise to recognize America’s rights.
B) vetoed Macon’s Bill No. 2.
C) allied the United States with Britain.
D) refused to trust Napoleon.
E) declared war on France.
A
29. Arrange the following events in chronological order: (A) war hawks enter Congress, (B)
declaration of war on Britain, (C) Embargo Act, (D) Battle of Tippecanoe.
A) A, B, C, D
B) C, A, D, B
C) B, C, A, D
D) B, A, D, C
E) B, C, D, A
B
30. Tecumseh argued that Indians should
A) never give control of their land to the whites.
B) move west of the Mississippi River.
C) not cede control of land to whites unless all Indians agreed.
D) exchange traditional buckskin clothing for cloth garments.
E) fight as individual tribes and not as a confederacy.
C