Chapter 34 Question

Chapter 34 Question

The spark for World War I was provided when Gavrilo Princip assassinated
a. Francis Joseph.
b. Nicholas II.
c. Alexander Kerensky.
d. Francis Ferdinand.
e. Otto von Bismarck.
d. Francis Ferdinand.
The first total war in world history was
a. the Crimean War.
b. the American Civil War.
c. World War II.
d. the Franco-Prussian War.
e. World War I.
e. World War I.
Approximately how many combatants died in World War I?
a. one million
b. three million
c. four million
d. nine million
e. fifteen million
e. fifteen million
The term for the idea that people with the same ethnic origins, language, and political ideals had the right to form sovereign states was
a. Utopian socialism.
b. positive nationalism.
c. democratic republicanism.
d. Fabianism.
e. self-determination.
e. self-determination.
The nationalistic aspirations of subject minorities was most threatening to a state such as
a. England.
b. Austria-Hungary.
c. Spain.
d. France.
e. Germany.
b. Austria-Hungary.
Slavic cultural unity was actively promoted by
a. Germany.
b. the United States.
c. Russia.
d. Austria-Hungary.
e. Italy.
c. Russia.
In 1914, England’s share of the world’s industrial output stood at
a. 3 percent, tied for tenth in the world.
b. 9 percent, having dropped behind that of the United States and Germany.
c. 14 percent, roughly the same as Germany’s.
d. 32 percent, the world’s largest.
e. 62 percent, twice as large as that of the nearest competitor.
c. 14 percent, roughly the same as Germany’s.
Which of the following was NOT an important area of competition and conflict between England and Germany in the years leading up to World War I?
a. religious differences
b. the naval race
c. colonial disputes
d. industrial and trade rivalry
e. nationalistic tensions
a. religious differences
The members of the Triple Alliance were
a. England, France, and Russia.
b. Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Russia.
c. Russia, Italy, and Germany.
d. Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy.
e. England, France, and Italy.
d. Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy.
The French were deeply suspicious of German expansion because of
a. Germany’s role in the final defeat of Napoleon.
b. the solid total alliance between the British and the Germans.
c. the rise of Adolf Hitler.
d. the inability of the French to forget their humiliating defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
e. German support for Basque separatists.
d. the inability of the French to forget their humiliating defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
The military plan that called for an invasion of France through Belgium was called
a. Plan XVII.
b. the Bismarck plan.
c. the Schlieffen plan.
d. the Brest-Litovsk Offense.
e. the Belgian insertion plan.
c. the Schlieffen plan.
The soldiers who marched off in 1914 to fight in World War I were mostly
a. depressed, because they remembered the incredible slaughter of the Franco-Prussian War.
b. mercenary troops.
c. draftees.
d. depressed because of their religious opposition to the war.
e. wildly enthusiastic.
e. wildly enthusiastic.
The German offensive of 1914 was halted at
a. Gallipoli.
b. the Marne River.
c. Verdun.
d. the Somme.
e. Prussia.
b. the Marne River.
The western front in World War I was
a. a German victory, after the French abandoned their English allies.
b. a bloody stalemate.
c. an overwhelming French and English victory.
d. a relatively easy German victory.
e. an Italian victory that changed the shape of the war.
b. a bloddy stalemate
The massive German assault on the western front in 1916 was
a. the Somme.
b. the Marne.
c. Gallipoli.
d. Verdun.
e. Caporetto.
d. Verdun.
Which of the following does NOT characterize the experience of trench warfare in World War I?
a. lice
b. rats
c. rain
d. cavalry charges
e. machine guns
d. cavalry charges
The Somme was
a. the battle in 1914 that halted the German Schlieffen plan.
b. a huge German offensive against the French lines in 1916.
c. a disastrous Italian defeat that destroyed any hope for an Italian invasion of Austria.
d. the first great American victory of the war.
e. an English assault in 1916 that gained a few thousand yards.
e. an English assault in 1916 that gained a few thousand yards.
In World War I, the eastern front was
a. ultimately a spectacular German success.
b. a bloody stalemate.
c. an Austrian victory in which they displaced Germany as the leading Central Power.
d. a hard-fought, albeit slow, English and French victory.
e. dominated by the Ottoman Turks.
a. ultimately a spectacular German success.
Which of the following was NOT a characteristic of the new total war of World War I?
a. the use of propaganda to inspire the participants to even greater sacrifice
b. unprecedented slaughter caused by new weapons
c. the extension of laissez-faire capitalism to its greatest freedom
d. the recognition of the importance of the home front in the war effort
e. the implementation of the draft
c. the extension of laissez-faire capitalism to its greatest freedom
What effect did World War I have on the status of women?
a. Working-class women enjoyed the greatest advancement in economic opportunity.
b. The demands of total war actually reduced opportunities for women.
c. All women were able to take advantage of new economic opportunities, which lasted long past the end of the war.
d. The slaughter caused by capitalistic tensions caused 32 percent of women to join socialist or communist parties.
e. Women in many countries received the vote in the years after the war.
e. Women in many countries received the vote in the years after the war.
The World War I poet who considered Horace’s line that it is “sweet and fitting to die for one’s country,” to be an “old Lie” was
a. Robert Graves.
b. Siegfried Sassoon.
c. Wilfred Owen.
d. Cecil Rhodes.
e. Joseph Caillaux.
c. Wilfred Owen.
Which one of the following is NOT an explanation of the expansion of World War I to Asia, Africa, and the Pacific?
a. European nations carried their animosities into their colonies.
b. Japan saw the war as an opportunity to grab German colonies.
c. The German invasion of neutral Belgium was a profound breech of international law.
d. Europeans were forced to recruit soldiers from their colonies because of the demands of the war.
e. Other nations entered the war for reasons that had nothing to do with the murder of Francis Ferdinand.
c. The German invasion of neutral Belgium was a profound breech of international law.
The Twenty-One Demands were issued
a. by the United States to Japan.
b. by Japan to China.
c. by Austria to Serbia.
d. by England to Germany.
e. by Germany to France.
b. by Japan to China.
The Japanese fought in World War I due to their
a. anger over German atrocities against Chinese civilians.
b. long-standing Franco-Japanese alliance.
c. fear of America entering into China.
d. desire to acquire German colonies in Asia.
e. concern over Austrian colonial aspirations in the Pacific.
d. desire to acquire German colonies in Asia.
Which of the following was a German African colony conquered by the Allies in the Great War?
a. Togoland
b. South Africa
c. Congo
d. Algeria
e. Nigeria
a. Togoland
The March Revolution of 1917
a. swept Lenin into power in Russia and led to the creation of the Soviet Union.
b. resulted in the long-anticipated collapse of the Ottoman empire.
c. forced France out of the war.
d. led to the establishment of a reform-minded provisional government in Russia.
e. erupted after the assassination of Nicholas II.
d. led to the establishment of a reform-minded provisional government in Russia.
The last tsar of Russia was
a. Alexander II.
b. Ivan IV.
c. Nicholas II.
d. Ivan III.
e. Alexander III.
c. Nicholas II.
The main reason for the failure of the provisional government in Russia in 1917 was
a. Lenin’s inexperience in actually running a government.
b. the growing rivalry between Stalin and Trotsky.
c. the strain placed on the government by the unpopular alliance with Germany.
d. the public’s desire for total victory, which clashed with the government’s pacifistic approach.
e. its inability to satisfy popular demands for an end to the war.
e. its inability to satisfy popular demands for an end to the war.
The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
a. was harsh toward the Germans and led to resentment after the war.
b. forged the alliance between England and France that would later be expanded to the Triple Entente.
c. forced the Chinese to give Hong Kong to the British.
d. ended Russia’s involvement in World War I.
e. was shaped by American desires.
d. ended Russia’s involvement in World War I.
The official factor in the United States’ decision to enter World War I was
a. its long-standing friendship with Great Britain.
b. its position as leader of the free world.
c. the U.S. desire to pick up German colonies in the Pacific.
d. age-old antagonism between the United States and the Ottoman Turks.
e. Germany’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare.
e. Germany’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare.
One of the major problems of the Paris peace negotiations that led to the Treaty of Versailles was
a. the dominant role played by the Russians at the conference.
b. Woodrow Wilson’s hard-line approach to negotiating with the Germans.
c. the U.S. refusal to participate.
d. Russia’s absence from the negotiations.
e. the stalling tactics practiced by the German and Austrian representatives.
d. Russia’s absence from the negotiations.
Woodrow Wilson agreed to many harsh stipulations to the Treaty of Versailles
a. because he felt that Germany had to be punished on the world stage.
b. because of his personal hatred of the French.
c. in return for the creation of the League of Nations.
d. because of his hatred for Germany, caused by the sinking of the Lusitania.
e. as a means of showing that democracy was the single best form of government.
c. in return for the creation of the League of Nations.
In the wake of World War I, Mustafa Kemal became president of
a. Russia.
b. Egypt.
c. Persia.
d. Syria.
e. Turkey.
e. Turkey
The mandate system
a. led to the occupation of Germany after the war.
b. allowed the Germans to repay their reparations to the Allied powers.
c. allowed for the rapid spread of communism.
d. angered the Arab world because it was little more than a glorified form of imperialism.
e. was one of Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points.
d. angered the Arab world because it was little more than a glorified form of imperialism.