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Army Regulation 600–20 Personnel–General Army Command Policy Rapid Action Revision (RAR) Issue Date: 20 September 2012 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 18 March 2008 UNCLASSIFIED SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 600–20 Army Command Policy This rapid action revision, dated 20 September 2012-o Updates policy for the administration of unit command climate surveys: adds requirement for personnel equivalent to company level commanders; updates timelines to within 30 days (120 days for Army National Guard and U. S. Army Reserve) of assuming command, again at 6 months, and annually thereafter (paras 6-3i(13) and E-1a). Updates confidentiality procedures: adds exceptions to the confidentiality of survey responses; adds requirement to provide inconspicuous location to submit paper and pencil format; provides guidance on group versus individual reporting (para E-2). o Deletes the tools used for obtaining the command climate surveys (para E-5). o Adds requirement for survey administrator and data collector to protect respondent anonymity and results confidentiality; adds exceptions to the confidentiality of survey responses; prohibits collection of personally identifiable information (para E-7). o

Makes administrative changes and updates paragraph titles (app E). o Note. Army Directive 2012-06, Centralized Selection List – Tour Length Policy for Command and Key Billets; Army Directive 2012-13, Policy and Implementing Guidance for Deployment Cycle Support; and ALARACT 007-2012, Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) Implementation Guidance will be incorporated in the next major revision. *Army Regulation 600–20 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 18 March 2008 Effective 18 April 2008 Personnel–General Army Command Policy History. This publication is a rapid action evision (RAR). This RAR is effective 20 September 2012. The portions affected by this RAR are listed in the summary of change. Summary. This regulation implements DODI 1332. 14 and DODI 1332. 30. It prescribes the policy and responsibility of command, which includes well-being of the force, military and personal discipline and conduct, the Army Equal Opportunity Program, Prevention of Sexual Harassment, and the Army Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program. Applicability. This regulation applies to the Active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United

States, and the U. S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated. During mobilization, the Contents proponent may modify chapters and policies contained in this regulation. Chapters 6 and 7 and appendixes E and F apply to Army National Guard Soldiers when on AD Title 10, for 30 days or more, and in all other cases, Army National Guard Soldiers are governed by NGR 600–21 and NGR 600–22. Portions of this regulation that prescribe specific conduct are punitive, and violations of these provisions may subject offenders to nonjudicial or judicial action under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

The equal opportunity terms found in the glossary are applicable only to uniformed personnel. AR 690–600 contains similar terms that are applicable to Department of Defense civilians. Proponent and exception authority. The proponent of this regulation is the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1. The proponent has the authority to approve exceptions or waivers to this regulation that are consistent with controlling law and regulations. The proponent may delegate this approval authority, in writing, to a division chief within the proponent agency or its direct reporting unit or field operating gency, in the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent. Activities may request a waiver to this regulation by providing justification that includes a full analysis of the expected benefits and must include formal review by the activity’s senior legal officer. All waiver requests will be endorsed by the commander or senior leader of the requesting activity and forwarded through their higher headquarters to the policy proponent. Refer to AR 2530 for specific guidance. Army management control process. This regulation does not contain management control provisions. Supplementation.

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Supplementation of this regulation and establishment of command and local forms are prohibited without prior approval from the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 (DAPE–HR–L), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0300. Suggested improvements. Users are invited to send comments and suggested improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 (DAPE–HR–L), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0300. Distribution. Distribution of this publication is available in electronic media only and is intended for command levels

A, B, C, D, and E for the Active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U. S. Army Reserve. (Listed by paragraph and page number) Chapter 1 Introduction, page 1 Purpose • 1–1, page 1 References • 1–2, page 1 Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1–3, page 1 Responsibilities • 1–4, page 1 Command • 1–5, page 1 *This regulation supersedes AR 600–20, dated 7 June 2006. This edition publishes a rapid action revision of AR 600–20. AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008/RAR 20 September 2012 UNCLASSIFIED i

Contents—Continued Military grade and rank • 1–6, page 2 Precedence between Soldiers and other Service members serving with the Army • 1–7, page 4 Precedence between members of the Army and members of foreign military services serving with the Army • 1–8, page 5 Chapter 2 Command Policies, page 6 Chain of command • 2–1, page 6 Open door policies • 2–2, page 6 Performance counseling • 2–3, page 6 Staff or technical channels • 2–4, page 6 Command of installations, activities, and units • 2–5, page 6 Specialty immaterial commands • 2–6, page 13

Designation of junior in the same grade to command • 2–7, page 13 Death, disability, retirement, reassignment, or absence of the commander • 2–8, page 14 Absence or disability of all officers of a unit • 2–9, page 14 Emergency command • 2–10, page 14 Functions of an individual in temporary command • 2–11, page 14 Responsibility of successor • 2–12, page 15 Separate commands of the U. S. Army serving together • 2–13, page 15 Separate commands of the several military Services of the United States serving together • 2–14, page 15 Ineligibility for command of post or activity • 2–15, page 15 Restrictions • 2–16, page 15

Relief for cause • 2–17, page 16 Noncommissioned officer support channel • 2–18, page 16 Precedence of relative grade, enlisted Soldiers • 2–19, page 17 Date of rank, enlisted Soldiers • 2–20, page 18 Chapter 3 Army Well-Being, page 19 General • 3–1, page 19 Definition • 3–2, page 20 Concept • 3–3, page 20 The Well-being framework • 3–4, page 20 Well-being strategic goals • 3–5, page 21 Well-being end state • 3–6, page 21 The Army Well-being strategic process • 3–7, page 21 Responsibilities • 3–8, page 22 Chapter 4 Military Discipline and Conduct, page 22 Military discipline • 4–1, page 22 Obedience to orders • 4–2, page 22

Military courtesy • 4–3, page 22 Soldier conduct • 4–4, page 23 Maintenance of order • 4–5, page 23 Exercising military authority • 4–6, page 23 Disciplinary powers of the commanding officer • 4–7, page 23 Settlement of local accounts on change of station • 4–8, page 24 Civil status of members of the Reserve component • 4–9, page 24 Participation in support of civilian law enforcement agencies • 4–10, page 24 Membership campaigns • 4–11, page 24 Extremist organizations and activities • 4–12, page 25 Army language policy • 4–13, page 26 Relationships between Soldiers of different rank • 4–14, page 26 ii

AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 Contents—Continued Other prohibited relationships • 4–15, page 27 Fraternization • 4–16, page 27 Standards of conduct • 4–17, page 27 Employment and volunteer work of spouse • 4–18, page 27 Hazing • 4–194–20, page 28 Informal funds • 4–21, page 29 Misuse of Government travel charge cards • 4–22, page 29 Domestic Violence Amendment to the Gun Control Act of 1968 • 4–23, page 30 Chapter 5 Other Responsibilities of Command, page 32 General • 5–1, page 32 Appearance before congressional committees • 5–2, page 32 Political activities • 5–3, page 32 Command aspects of medical care • 5–4, page 34

Family care plans • 5–5, page 36 Accommodating religious practices • 5–6, page 40 Prohibition of military labor unions • 5–7, page 44 Complaints or accusations against military personnel • 5–8, page 45 On-post distribution of non-Government printed materials • 5–9, page 46 The Total Army Family Program • 5–10, page 47 Federal Parent Locator Service • 5–11, page 48 Military Whistleblower Protection Act • 5–12, page 48 Human relations readiness training • 5–13, page 49 Unit memorial policy • 5–14, page 49 Chapter 6 The Equal Opportunity Program in the Army, page 50 Purpose • 6–1, page 50

Equal opportunity policy • 6–2, page 50 Responsibilities • 6–3, page 51 The Army’s Equal Opportunity Advisor of the Year Award • 6–4, page 56 Staffing • 6–5, page 56 Program manager/equal opportunity advisor selection and assignment policy • 6–6, page 57 Attendance at the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute • 6–7, page 58 Off-post activities, on-post activities, and off-limit actions • 6–8, page 59 Procedures for processing equal opportunity complaints • 6–9, page 60 Housing complaints • 6–10, page 60 Evaluation reports • 6–11, page 60 Civilian schooling • 6–12, page 60 Legal assistance • 6–13, page 60

Equal Opportunity Action Plans • 6–14, page 60 Training • 6–15, page 61 Authority to collect and maintain data • 6–16, page 62 Narrative and statistical reports on EO progress • 6–17, page 62 Training for civilian duty positions in the military Equal Opportunity Program at Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute • 6–18, page 62 Equal opportunity special/ethnic observances • 6–19, page 63 Chapter 7 Prevention of Sexual Harassment, page 63 Overview • 7–1, page 63 Chain of command responsibilities • 7–2, page 64 Policy • 7–3, page 64 Definition • 7–4, page 64 AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 iii

Contents—Continued Categories of sexual harassment • 7–5, page 64 Types of sexual harassment • 7–6, page 65 Techniques of dealing with sexual harassment • 7–7, page 65 Training • 7–8, page 65 Complaints • 7–9, page 66 Chapter 8 Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, page 66 Purpose and goals of the program • 8–1, page 66 Sexual assault policy • 8–2, page 66 Victim Advocacy Program • 8–3, page 66 Definitions • 8–4, page 67 Responsibilities • 8–5, page 67 Deployable sexual assault response coordinator and unit victim advocate selection criteria • 8–6, page 77 Training • 8–7, page 77

Appendixes A. References, page 79 B. Political Activities, page 88 C. Deleted, page 89 D. Equal opportunity/Sexual Harassment Complaint Processing System, page 90 E. Command Climate Survey, page 97 F. The Sexual Assault Review Board, page 98 G. Army Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program Sexual Assault Victim Assistance Actions, page 99 H. Confidentiality/Restricted Reporting, page 100 I. Essential Training Tasks for a Sexual Assault Response Capability, page 102 J. Sexual Assault Forensic Exam, Collection, and Preservation of Evidence under Restricted Reporting, page 106 K.

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program Assessment, page 108 Table List Table 1–1: Grades of rank, U. S. Army, page 3 Table 1–2: Comparable rank among the Services, page 5 Table 6–1: Special commemorations/ethnic observances timetable, page 55 Figure List Figure Figure Figure Figure 2–1: 2–1: 2–2: 2–3: Command relationships at CONUS IMCOM managed installations, page 9 Command relationships at OCONUS IMCOM managed installations – continued, page 10 Assumption of command, page 11 Appointment of commander, page 12 Glossary Index iv AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 Chapter 1 Introduction 1–1. Purpose

This regulation prescribes the policies and responsibilities of command, which include the Well-being of the force, military discipline, and conduct, the Army Equal Opportunity (EO) Program, and the Army Sexual Assault Victim Program. 1–2. References Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A. 1–3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are listed in the glossary. 1–4. Responsibilities The detailed responsibilities are listed and described in separate chapters under specific programs and command functions.

This paragraph outlines general responsibilities. a. The Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 (DCS, G–1) will formulate, manage, and evaluate command policies, plans, and programs that relate to: (1) Chain of command (para 2–1), designation of junior in the same grade to command (para 2–7), and assumption of command by the senior when the commander dies, is disabled, resigns, retires, or is absent (para 2–8). (2) The Army Well-being concept (para 3–3), architecture (para 3–4), process (para 3–7), and integration of all Army Well-being related programs (para 3–8). 3) Extremist organizations and activities (para 4–12), relationships between Soldiers of different rank (para 4–14), and other prohibited relationships (para 4–15). (4) Political activities (para 5–3), Family care plans (para 5–5), accommodation of religious practices (para 5–6), and Human Relations Readiness Training (HRRT) (para 5–13). (5) The Army EO Program (para 6–2). (6) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program (para 8–3). b. The officials listed below have responsibilities for specific groups of personnel concerning awareness of the Army’s accommodation of religious practices policies.

Every enlisted Soldier (including reenlistment), cadet, warrant officer (WO), and commissioned officer applicant needs to be informed of the Army’s accommodation of religious practices policies under this regulation (para 5–6). (1) The Judge Advocate General. All judge advocate officer accessions. (2) The Chief of Chaplains. All chaplain officer accessions. This principal Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) official will also formulate and disseminate education and training programs regarding religious traditions and practices within the U.

S. Army. (3) The Superintendent, U. S. Military Academy. All U. S. Military Academy cadet applicants. (4) The Commanding General, U. S. Army Training and Doctrine Command ( CG, TRADOC). All Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets and all officer and WO candidates. (5) The Commanding General, U. S. Army Recruiting Command (CG, USAREC). All enlisted and Army Medical Department (AMEDD) officer accessions. c. Commanders at all levels will implement and enforce the chain of command and Army command (ACOM) policies. 1–5. Command a. Privilege to command.

Command is exercised by virtue of office and the special assignment of members of the United States Armed Forces holding military grade who are eligible to exercise command. A commander is, therefore, a commissioned or WO who, by virtue of grade and assignment, exercises primary command authority over a military organization or prescribed territorial area that under pertinent official directives is recognized as a “command. ” The privilege to command is not limited solely by branch of Service except as indicated in chapter 2.

A civilian, other than the President as Commander-in-Chief (or National Command Authority), may not exercise command. However, a civilian may be designated to exercise general supervision over an Army installation or activity (for example, Dugway Proving Ground). b. Elements of command. The key elements of command are authority and responsibility. Formal authority for command is derived from the policies, procedures, and precedents presented in chapters 1 through 3. c. Characteristics of command leadership. The commander is responsible for establishing leadership climate of the unit and developing disciplined and cohesive units.

This sets the parameters within which command will be exercised and, therefore, sets the tone for social and duty relationships within the command. Commanders are also responsible for AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008/RAR 4 August 2011 1 the professional development of their Soldiers. To this end, they encourage self-study, professional development, and continued growth of their subordinates’ military careers. (1) Commanders and other leaders committed to the professional Army ethic promote a positive environment. If leaders show loyalty to their Soldiers, the Army, and the nation, they earn the loyalty of their Soldiers.

If leaders consider their Soldiers’ needs and care for their Well-being, and if they demonstrate genuine concern, these leaders build a positive command climate. (2) Duty is obedient and disciplined performance. Soldiers with a sense of duty accomplish tasks given them, seize opportunities for self-improvement, and accept responsibility from their superiors. Soldiers, leader and led alike, work together to accomplish the mission rather than feed their self-interest. (3) Integrity is a way of life. Demonstrated integrity is the basis for dependable, consistent information, decisionmaking, and delegation of authority. 4) Professionally competent leaders will develop respect for their authority by— (a) Striving to develop, maintain, and use the full range of human potential in their organization. This potential is a critical factor in ensuring that the organization is capable of accomplishing its mission. (b) Giving troops constructive information on the need for and purpose of military discipline. Articles in the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) that require explanation will be presented in such a way to ensure that Soldiers are fully aware of the controls and obligations imposed on them by virtue of their military Service (see UCMJ, ART. 37). (c) Properly training their Soldiers and ensuring that both Soldiers and equipment are in the proper state of readiness at all times. Commanders should assess the command climate periodically to analyze the human dimension of combat readiness. Soldiers must be committed to accomplishing the mission through the unit cohesion developed as a result of a healthy leadership climate established by the command. Leaders at all levels promote the individual readiness of their Soldiers by developing competence and confidence in their subordinates.

In addition to being mentally, physically, tactically, and technically competent, Soldiers must have confidence in themselves, their equipment, their peers, and their leaders. A leadership climate in which all Soldiers are treated with fairness, justice, and equity will be crucial to development of this confidence within Soldiers. Commanders are responsible for developing disciplined and cohesive units sustained at the highest readiness level possible. (d) Requirement of Exemplary Conduct (Section 3583, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC 3583)). All commanding officers and others in authority in the Army are required— 1.

To show in themselves a good example of virtue, honor, patriotism, and subordination. 2. To be vigilant in inspecting the conduct of all persons who are placed under their command. 3. To guard against and suppress all dissolute and immoral practices, and to correct, according to the laws and regulations of the Army, all persons who are guilty of them. 4. To take all necessary and proper measures, under the laws, regulations, and customs of the Army. 5. To promote and safeguard the morale, the physical Well-being, and the general welfare of the officers and enlisted persons under their command or charge. . Assignment and command. Soldiers are assigned to stations or units where their services are required. The commanding officer then assigns appropriate duties. Without orders from proper authority, a Soldier may only assume command when eligible according to chapter 2. 1–6. Military grade and rank a. Military rank among officers of the same grade or of equivalent grade is determined by comparing dates of rank. An officer whose date of rank (DOR) is earlier than the DOR of another officer of the same or equivalent grade is senior to that officer.

Grade and precedence of rank confers eligibility to exercise command or authority in the U. S. military within limits prescribed by law (Section 741, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC 741)). b. Grade is generally held by virtue of office or position in the Army. For example, second lieutenant (2LT), captain (CPT), sergeant first class (SFC), chief warrant officer two (CW2) are grades. Table 1–1 shows the grades in the Army in order of their precedence. It indicates the grouping of grades into classes, pay grades, titles of address, and abbreviations. c.

The pay grade is also an abbreviated numerical device with useful applications in pay management, personnel accounting, automated data organization, and other administrative fields. However, the numerical pay grade will not be used as a form of address or title in place of the proper title of address of grade. A Soldier holding the numerical pay grade of E–5 will be addressed as “Sergeant,” not as “E–5” (see table 1–1). d. All chaplains are addressed as “Chaplain,” regardless of military grade or professional title. When a chaplain is addressed in writing, grade s indicated in parentheses; for example, Chaplain (Major) John F. Doe. e. Conferring honorary titles of military grade upon civilians is prohibited. However, honorary titles already conferred will not be withdrawn. 2 AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 Table 1–1 Grades of rank, U. S. Army General officers Grade of rank: General of the Army Pay grade: Special Title of address: General Abbreviation: GA (See table note 1) Grade of rank: Major General Pay grade: O-8 Title of address: General Abbreviation: MG Grade of rank: General Pay grade: O-10 Title of address: General Abbreviation: GEN

Grade of rank: Brigadier General Pay grade: O-7 Title of address: General Abbreviation: BG Grade of rank: Lieutenant General Pay grade: O-9 Title of address: General Abbreviation: LTG Field grade officers Grade of rank: Colonel Pay grade: O-6 Title of address: Colonel Abbreviation: COL Grade of rank: Major Pay grade: O-4 Title of address: Major Abbreviation: MAJ Grade of rank: Lieutenant Colonel Pay grade: O-5 Title of address: Colonel Abbreviation: LTC Company grade officers Grade of rank: Captain Pay grade: O-3 Title of address: Captain Abbreviation: CPT Grade of rank: Second Lieutenant Pay grade: O-1

Title of address: Lieutenant Abbreviation: 2LT Grade of rank: First Lieutenant Pay grade: O-2 Title of address: Lieutenant Abbreviation: 1LT Warrant officers Grade of rank: Chief Warrant Officer, Five Pay grade: W-5 Title of address: Mister (Mrs. /Miss/Ms. ) Abbreviation: CW5 Grade of rank: Chief Warrant Officer, Three Pay grade: W-3 Title of address: Mister (Mrs. /Miss/Ms. ) Abbreviation: CW3 Grade of rank: Chief Warrant Officer, Four Grade of rank: Chief Warrant Officer, Two Pay grade: W-2 Title of address: Mister (Mrs. /Miss/Ms. ) Abbreviation: CW2 Pay grade: W-4 Title of address: Mister (Mrs. Miss/Ms. ) Abbreviation: CW4 Grade of rank: Warrant Officer, One Pay grade: W-1 Title of address: Mister (Mrs. /Miss/Ms. ) Abbreviation: WO1 Cadets Grade of rank: Cadet, U. S. Military Academy Pay grade: Special Title of address: Mister/Miss/Ms. /Cadet Abbreviation: CDT Grade of rank: Cadet, Senior Advanced Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) Pay grade: Special Title of address: Mister/Miss/Ms/Cadet Abbreviation: CDT AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 3 Table 1–1 Grades of rank, U. S. Army—Continued Candidates Grade of rank: Officer Candidate Pay grade: Special Title of address: Candidate

Abbreviation: OC Grade of rank: Warrant Officer Candidate Pay grade: Special Title of address: Candidate Abbreviation: WOC Enlisted Grade or rank: Sergeant Major of the Army Pay grade: E-9 Title of address: Sergeant Major Abbreviation: SMA Grade of rank: Staff Sergeant Pay grade: E-6 Title of address: Sergeant Abbreviation: SSG Grade of rank: Command Sergeant Major (See table note 2) Pay grade: E-9 Title of address: Sergeant Major Abbreviation: CSM Grade of rank: Sergeant Pay grade: E-5 Title of address: Sergeant Abbreviation: SGT Grade of rank: Sergeant Major (See table note 3) Pay grade: E-9

Title of address: Sergeant Major Abbreviation: SGM Grade of rank: Specialist (See table note 4) Pay grade: E-4 Title of address: Specialist Abbreviation: SP4 (See table note 5) Grade of rank: First Sergeant Pay grade: E-8 Title of address: First Sergeant Abbreviation: 1SG Grade of rank: Private First Class Pay grade: E-3 Title of address: Private Abbreviation: PFC Grade of rank: Master Sergeant Pay grade: E-8 Title of address: Sergeant Abbreviation: MSG Grade of rank: Private Pay grade: E-2 Title of address: Private Abbreviation: PV2 Grade of rank: Sergeant First Class Pay grade: E-7

Title of address: Sergeant Abbreviation: SFC Grade of rank: Private Pay grade: E-l Title of address: Private Abbreviation: PV1 Grade of rank: Corporal Pay grade: E-4 Title of address: Corporal Abbreviation: CPL Notes: 1 Other abbreviations authorized for use in correspondence with the general public and agencies outside DOD, on identification (ID) cards, and in personal correspondence are listed in AR 25–50 and AR 25–52. 2 Personnel formally selected by DA for participation in the Command Sergeants Major Program. 3 All E–9s not formally selected for the Command Sergeants Major Program. Specialist will rank immediately below corporal. This does not require or justify change to table of organization and equipment (TOE) or table of distribution and allowances (TDA). 5 Specialist and its abbreviation (SPC) will be used in written correspondence. All Standard Installation/Division Personnel System (SIDPERS) transactions must be coded and entered using the preset code (SP4) until SIDPERS III is fielded. 1–7. Precedence between Soldiers and other Service members serving with the Army Members of other Services serving with the Army have equal status with Army Soldiers of equivalent grade. Comparable grades among the Services are shown in table 1–2. ) 4 AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 Table 1–2 Comparable rank among the Services Army Air Force Marine Corps Navy Officers General of the Army General of the Air Force General General General Admiral Fleet Admiral Lieutenant General Lieutenant General Lieutenant General Vice Admiral Major General Major General Major General Rear Admiral (U) Brigadier General Brigadier General Brigadier General Rear Admiral (L) Colonel Colonel Colonel Captain Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Commander Major Major Major Lieutenant Commander

Captain Captain Captain Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Ensign Chief Warrant Officer Five Chief Warrant Officer Five Chief Warrant Officer Chief Warrant Officer Four Chief Warrant Officer Four Chief Warrant Officer Chief Warrant Officer Three Chief Warrant Officer Three Chief Warrant Officer Chief Warrant Officer Two Chief Warrant Officer Two Chief Warrant Officer Chief Warrant Officer One Chief Warrant Officer One Chief Warrant Officer Cadets Cadet Cadet —- Midshipman Enlisted

Sergeant Major of the Army Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Sergeant Major of the Marine Force Corps Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Command Sergeant Major Command Chief Master Sergeant Sergeant Major Command Master Chief Petty Officer Sergeant Major Chief Master Sergeant Master Gunnery Sergeant Master Chief Petty Officer First Sergeant Senior Master Sergeant First Sergeant Officer Senior Chief Petty Officer Master Sergeant —- Master Sergeant —- Sergeant First Class Master Sergeant Gunnery Sergeant Chief Petty Officer Staff Sergeant Technical Sergeant Staff Sergeant Petty Officer First Class Sergeant

Staff Sergeant Sergeant Petty Officer Second Class Corporal Sergeant Corporal Petty Officer Third Class Specialist —- —- —- Private First Class Airman First Class Lance Corporal Seaman Private Airman Private First Class Seaman Apprentice Private Airman Basic Private Seaman Recruit 1–8. Precedence between members of the Army and members of foreign military services serving with the Army Members of foreign military services serving with the U. S. Army have equal status with Army members of equivalent grade. When authorized by the President or the Secretary of Defense, members of foreign military service erving with the U. S. Army may exercise operational or tactical control, but they may not exercise command over Soldiers of the U. S. Army. AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 5 Chapter 2 Command Policies 2–1. Chain of command a. The chain of command assists commanders at all levels to achieve their primary function of accomplishing the unit’s assigned mission while caring for personnel and property in their charge. A simple and direct chain of command facilitates the transmittal of orders from the highest to the lowest levels in a minimum of time and with the least chance of misinterpretation.

The command channel extends upward in the same manner for matters requiring official communication from subordinate to senior. b. Commanders are responsible for everything their command does or fails to do. However, commanders subdivide responsibility and authority and assign portions of both to various subordinate commanders and staff members. In this way, a proper degree of responsibility becomes inherent in each command echelon. Commanders delegate sufficient authority to Soldiers in the chain of command to accomplish their assigned duties, and commanders may hold these Soldiers responsible for their actions.

Commanders who assign responsibility and authority to their subordinates still retain the overall responsibility for the actions of their commands. c. Proper use of the chain of command is vital to the overall effectiveness of the Army. Commanders must acquaint all their Soldiers with its existence and proper function. Effective communication between senior and subordinate Soldiers within the chain of command is crucial to the proper functioning of all units. Therefore, Soldiers will use the chain of command when communicating issues and problems to their leaders and commanders. 2–2. Open door policies

Commanders will establish an open door policy within their commands. Soldiers are responsible to ensure that the commander is made aware of problems that affect discipline, morale, and mission effectiveness; and an open door policy allows members of the command to present facts, concerns, and problems of a personal or professional nature or other issues that the Soldier has been unable to resolve. The timing, conduct, and specific procedures of the open door policy are determined by the commander. He or she is responsible for ensuring that Soldiers are aware of the command’s open door policy. –3. Performance counseling Commanders will ensure that all members of their command receive timely performance counseling. Effective performance counseling of officers, noncommissioned officers (NCO), enlisted Soldiers, and DA civilian employees helps to ensure that they are prepared to carry out their duties efficiently and accomplish the mission. AR 623–3 and AR 690–400 contain counseling requirements in conjunction with the evaluation reporting systems. Unit commanders will determine the timing and specific methods used to provide guidance and direction through counseling.

FM 6–22 provides advice and makes suggestions concerning effective counseling. Providing regular and effective performance counseling to all Soldiers, not just those whose performance fails to meet unit standards, is a command function. All commanders will ensure that their subordinate commanders have implemented and are maintaining an effective performance counseling program. 2–4. Staff or technical channels Staff or technical channels may be used for sending reports, information, or instructions not involving variations from command policy and directives. 2–5. Command of installations, activities, and units a.

Responsibility. The senior regularly assigned United States Army officer present for duty normally has responsibility for the command of units, platoon level and above, except as shown in paragraphs 2–8a, 2–15, and 2–16. b. Command of installations. Command of Army installations is subject to policies, procedures, and regulations promulgated by HQDA. (1) Command of Army installations is exercised by a senior commander (SC). The SC is designated by senior Army leadership. The SC’s command authority over the installation derives from the Chief of Staff, Army (CSA) and Secretary of the Army’s (SA) authority over installations.

This is a direct delegation of command authority for the installation to the SC. The SC’s command authority includes all authorities inherent in command including the authority to ensure the maintenance of good order and discipline for the installation. (2) Army installations are identified in one of two categories as follows: (a) Installations managed by Installation Management Command (IMCOM). Installations that are managed by IMCOM are discussed in paragraph b(4)(e), below. (b) Installations not managed by IMCOM. Installations that are not managed by IMCOM are discussed in paragraph 2–5b(4)(f), below. 3) Joint bases. Army installations designated for management under Department of Defense (DOD) Joint Basing 6 AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 Guidance shall be operated in full compliance with DOD requirements. In the event of a discrepancy between this regulation and the DOD policies or procedures for Joint basing, the DOD policies or procedures take precedence. (4) Roles and responsibilities. (a) Senior commander. The SC is normally the senior general officer at the installation. The SC’s mission is the care of Soldiers, Families, and Civilians, and to enable unit readiness.

While the delegation of senior command authority is direct from HQDA, the SC will routinely resolve installation issues with IMCOM and, as needed, the associated ACOM, Army service component command (ASCC), or direct reporting unit (DRU). The SC uses the garrison as the primary organization to provide services and resources to customers in support of accomplishing this mission. All applicable commands support the SC in the execution of SC responsibilities; therefore, the SC is the supported commander by the IMCOM region director (RD), the garrison and tenants.

The SC— 1. Normally is a dual-hatted position. When this occurs the commander exercises discrete authorities as the SC and as a mission commander. The SC responsibilities and authorities are installation focused; the responsibilities and authorities as the mission commander are mission focused. 2. Can, in rare cases, be an HQDA-appointed civilian versus a uniformed SC, who will assume the SC roles and responsibilities with the exception of UCMJ and command authority. In these instances, the individual will be referred to as the senior manager.

Prior to the appointment of the senior manager, command and UCMJ authorities for the installation will be specified. 3. Is responsible for synchronizing and integrating Army priorities and initiatives at the installation. On IMCOM managed installations there is a requirement for a strong collaborative relationship between the SC and the IMCOM RD. The SC commands the installation but funding of almost all installation activities flows through the RD. 4. Assumes the duties and responsibilities of the installation commander where that title is mentioned in U. S. Code or DOD or Army policies and regulations. . Assumes the duties and responsibilities of the senior mission commander where that title is mentioned in Army regulations except for regulations involving operational duties and responsibilities. Mission commanders will retain operational duties and responsibilities. 6. Unless prohibited by law or regulation, the SC may delegate, as necessary, assigned duties and responsibilities to the garrison commander (GC). Such delegation shall be made in writing and specifically state the duties and responsibilities so delegated and the termination date of the delegation. 7.

Establishes installation priorities among all resident and supported units. 8. Prioritizes base operations support consistent with HQDA priorities and approved common levels of support (CLS) bands. 9. Oversees the CLS services and capabilities provided to customers. Ensuring that those services are provided within the HQDA guidance, designated priorities, and approved CLS bands and coordinates with the IMCOM RD to change HQDA approved CLS from green, amber, or red. 10. Approves and submits the installation master plan consistent with HQDA long-range plans and goals through the ACOMS, ASCCs or DRUs, and IMCOM.

For IMCOM installations the SC collaborates with the IMCOM RD before the SC submits the installation master plan. 11. Approves the military construction, Army (MCA) and military construction, Army Reserve (MCAR) project priority list at the installation level. For IMCOM installations the SC collaborates with the IMCOM RD before the SC approves the MCA and MCAR project priority list for the installation. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers executes MCA/MCAR projects for the Army. 12. Reviews and approves the prioritization of Family and installation programs.

For IMCOM installations the SC collaborates with the IMCOM RD before the SC approves Family and installation programs for the installation. 13. Installation force protection (FP) is as follows: (a) continental United States (CONUS) SC: as directed by U. S. Army North (USARNORTH) and in coordination with the installation management headquarters (IMCOM and NonIMCOM), oversees FP on the installation; (b) outside continental United States (OCONUS) SC: in coordination with the ASCC and IMCOM is responsible for FP oversight on the installation. 14. Is normally designated as a General Court-Martial Convening Authority (GCMCA).

The GCMCA orders will specify the appellate and review channels for SC GCMCA actions. 15. The appellate and review authority for administrative actions taken by the SC pertaining to individual Soldiers and DA Civilians will flow through ACOM, ASCC, or DRU channels unless otherwise specified in Army regulations. The terms “next superior authority,” “next higher authority,” “next higher commander,” and “next higher headquarters” as used in other Army regulations, mean ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commander or headquarters. 16. Serves as the senior Army representative to the surrounding community. 7. Senior rates the GC. (b) Garrison commander. The GC is a military officer, lieutenant colonel or colonel, selected by HQDA. The GC commands the garrison, is the SC’s senior executive for installation activities, is rated by the IMCOM RD, and is senior rated by the SC. The GC is responsible for day-to-day operation and management of installations and base support services. The GC ensures that installation services and capabilities are provided in accordance with HQDA AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 7 directed programs, SC guidance, CLS, and IMCOM guidance.

The GC provides additional service support in accordance with HQDA directives and provides reimbursable services in accordance with memorandum of understanding or agreement (MOU/MOA). The GC is responsible to deliver Family and installation programs, coordinates and integrates the delivery of support from other service providers, and obtains SC approval of the installation master plan. The GC may be appointed as a Summary Courts-Martial Convening Authority or the Special Courts-Martial convening authority for the installation and its support area; in rare cases the GC may be appointed as GCMCA.

In some cases, the senior official on an installation may be the garrison manager. A garrison manager (the civilian equivalent of a GC has the same responsibility and authority as the military counterpart with the exception of UCMJ and command authority. Prior to the appointment of the garrison manager, command and UCMJ authorities for the garrison will be specified. The GC responsibilities are— 1. Represents the Army and the installation in the surrounding community as directed by the SC. 2.

Approves and issues garrison policies in accordance with respective Army regulations, or installation level policies involving tenant units as directed by the SC. 3. Approves and issues policies for IMCOM civilian workforce. 4. Develops and implements the Force Protection Program. 5. Supports mobilization station requirements. (c) The ACOM, ASCC, or DRU on IMCOM managed installations. 1. Provide to IMCOM a prioritized list of MCA/MCAR projects and requirements that impact subordinate units to support the development of the military construction (MILCON) program and the program objective memorandum. . Provide IMCOM with subordinate mission priority requirements for MILCON and base operations. 3. Identify to IMCOM, through the CLS process and other requirements development processes, the required levels of garrison support needed to meet mission requirements. Also, identify to IMCOM any support requirements not included in CLS services. Collaborate with IMCOM in developing garrison support requirements that are applicable to all garrisons. 4. Evaluate the effectiveness of installation services and support and participate in the prioritization of these services and support. 5.

Responsible for mobilization of subordinates as specified in AR 10–87. 6. Provide prioritization requirements for information technology and training enabler support to IMCOM. 7. Responsibilities for FP are: (a) OCONUS: The Geographic Combatant commander exercises Combatant Command (Command Authority) (COCOM) authority over all aspects of FP in the AOR and delegates authority for FP as deemed appropriate and necessary. This includes all aspects of FP on Army installations without exception; (b) CONUS: Commander, USNORTHCOM has tactical control (for FP) over all DOD personnel and assets in the AOR.

USARNORTH is designated as USNORTHCOM’s ASCC; the authority to execute the FP mission in CONUS is delegated from Commander, USNORTHCOM; (1) USARNORTH has direct command and control authority over commands when executing FP responsibilities for installations/facilities (FP reporting commands/SCs when executing FP responsibilities for installations/facilities); (2) USARNORTH has a supported/supporting relationship with commands not executing responsibilities for installations/facilities (FP supporting commands). (d) Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management.

The ACSIM is the proponent for all Army installations and in this capacity is responsible for installation policy development and implementation Armywide. The ACSIM does not exercise command authority over Army installations. 1. The ACSIM ensures that real property accountability and reporting is implemented at all installations (see AR 405–45). 2. The ACSIM manages HQDA level MILCON in accordance with HQDA priorities and guidance. 3. The ACSIM is the proponent for environmental policy Armywide. (e) Installation Management Command. The ACSIM is dual-hatted as the Commander of IMCOM.

IMCOM is a DRU reporting to the ACSIM as described in AR 10–87. IMCOM manages Army installations assigned to it. IMCOM executes installation readiness missions, provides equitable services and facilities, optimizes resources, sustains the environment, and enhances the well-being of the military community. IMCOM is accountable for the efficient delivery of installation services and support. The IMCOM is responsive to ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs through a supporting to supported relationship. 1. IMCOM commands the garrisons assigned to it. 2.

IMCOM and its subordinate organizations are supporting commands to the SC on IMCOM installations. There is a requirement for a strong collaborative relationship between the SC and the IMCOM RD. The SC commands the installation but funding of almost all installation activities flows through the RD. 3. The relationship between IMCOM and the commands of tenant organizations is analogous to the “supporting to supported” command relationship described in Joint Doctrine. 4. The IMCOM RD rates the GC. 5. IMCOM ensures compliance with HQDA directed programs and CLS bands. IMCOM staffs and coordinates with AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 HQDA funding requests for garrison support requirements identified by ACOM, ASCC, or DRUs that are not included in CLS services. 6. There is a difference between command relationship in CONUS and OCONUS for IMCOM installations. These relationships are depicted in figure 2–1. Figure 2–1. Command relationships at CONUS IMCOM managed installations AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 9 Figure 2–1. Command relationships at OCONUS IMCOM managed installations – continued (f) Non-IMCOM Installations. The SC is designated in accordance with paragraph b(4)(g), below.

The SC roles and responsibilities are the same as for all other Army installations. 1. Army National Guard (ARNG) installations are managed in compliance with National Guard Bureau (NGB) requirements by individual U. S. Property and Fiscal Officers. 2. U. S. Army Materiel Command (AMC) installations are managed in compliance with AR 700–90 and other appropriate industrial base authorities. 3. U. S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) installations are managed in compliance with AR 40–4. 4. Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command performs terminal management services as a subordinate of USTRANSCOM under the authority of DODD 5158. 4 and other appropriate authorities. 5. U. S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Strategic Command installations are managed in compliance with AR 700–90 and other appropriate industrial base documents. 6. The TRADOC ROTC detachments and recruiting sites do not provide garrison support functions and do not have garrison activities. 7. U. S. Army Corps of Engineers’ funded installations and separate facilities not on IMCOM installations are managed in accordance with Federal law, AR 420–1, and other appropriate regulations. g) Change of senior commander. 1. Permanent change. (a) CONUS. Commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs may request a permanent change of SC designation through the HQDA (DACS–GOM); (b) OCONUS. The ASCC may request a permanent change of SC designation through the HQDA (DACS–GOM). 2. Temporary change. When temporarily absent from the installation, to include deployment, SCs may remain in command of installations or may relinquish command and designate an acting commander after coordination with applicable ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commanders.

When designating an acting commander the SC will notify senior Army leadership, HQ IMCOM, and affected mission commands. Designation of an acting commander shall be in accordance with the procedures established in this regulation for appointing acting commanders. c. Uniform Code of Military Justice authority. UCMJ authority will be governed by AR 27–10, paragraph 5–2. (1) Army commanders in the grade of lieutenant general or above may not assume command of Army installations, except where the installation serves as the location for an Army Corps, CONUS Army, or higher headquarters. An 10 AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 xception to this policy must be approved by General Officer Management Office, Chief of Staff (DACS–GOM), 200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0200. (2) ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commanders may relieve tactical commanders of installation responsibilities by designating a junior officer, equal or higher in grade to the GC of the permanent station, as installation commander. (3) Command of installations and units under the AMEDD will be as prescribed in AR 40–1. d. Announcement of assumption of command. Assumption of command will be announced in a memorandum and will contain the information shown in figure 2–2.

To preclude two separate documents, appointment (applies only to three- and four-star general officers) and assumption announcements may be included in a single memorandum, as shown in figure 2–3. Senior mission commander delegation will be indicated, as required, by GOMO on the individual’s permanent change of station (PCS) orders. Figure 2–2. Assumption of command AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 11 Figure 2–3. Appointment of commander (1) Oral assumption of command. Oral assumption of command may be used by units not using orders or other documentation to announce assumption of command or when other circumstances necessitate.

Oral assumption of command should be followed by a written assumption of command memorandum as expeditiously as possible. (2) Distribution. Distribution will be limited to one copy to each person concerned, subordinate commands or elements, interested commands, or agencies, and the next higher headquarters. A copy will be placed in the files of the issuing command and/or the affected command. When a general officer, or general officer designee, assumes permanent command, one copy will be furnished to General Officer Management Office, Chief of Staff (DACS–GOM), 200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0200. 3) Filing. Organizations and units governed by AR 25–400–2 will file one copy of the assumption document under Organizational History files. Disposition is shown in those documents. (4) Correction and amendments. Assumption of command documents will be amended, rescinded, or revoked by publishing the correct information in another assumption of command document. The document containing the correction will properly identify (by date) the document being corrected, and state to whom it pertains. The amended document will be distributed and filed, as appropriate. . Optimum length of command tours. The optimum length of command tours will be based on the needs of the Army, stability within units, the need for officers with command experience, and availability of personnel. Normal optimum command tours are as follows: (1) For company grade, 18 months with a minimum of 12 months. (2) For field grade, normal command tour length for battalion/brigade commanders is 24 months or coincides with tour length for short tour and may be as long as 36 months or more for life-cycle manned units.

Curtailments must be requested in writing by the affected officer. Commanding general (MG or above), in coordination with the CG, U. S. Army Human Resources Command (AHRC) may curtail or extend field grade command tours up to 30 days. The ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commanders in coordination with the CG, AHRC may curtail or extend field grade command tours for 31 to 60 days. The CSA approval is required for curtailment and extensions of field grade command tours for more than 61 days or for any extensions of field grade command beyond the normal 36 months. 3) In overseas areas where the tour length precludes such tenure of command, the command tour will coincide with the overseas tour. (4) A battalion level command normally will not be held by a colonel. Accordingly, if a promotable lieutenant colonel serving as a battalion commander has a projected promotion date during the command tour, ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commanders will coordinate with AHRC to schedule a change of command date as close as possible to the projected promotion date of the officer.

In cases where the change of command would adversely affect significant operational requirement, the ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commander will submit a request through the CG, AHRC to HQDA for exception to policy. f. Command by general officers. Except as indicated in paragraph 2–8, a general officer will not be assigned without the prior approval of General Officer Management Office, Chief of Staff (DACS–GOM), 200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0200. 12 AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 g. Command of dental units.

The senior Dental Corps officer, assigned or attached to a dental TOE unit deployed to receive and treat patients, will assume command of that unit until properly relieved. h. Command of veterinary units. The senior veterinary officer assigned or attached to a veterinary unit deployed to care for Government-owned animals, for food inspection responsibilities, and/or for civic action programs, will assume command of that unit until properly relieved. i. Command of Active Army training units.

Army National Guard of the United States (ARNGUS) officers (when activated under Title 10, USC) and U. S. Army Reserve (USAR) officers, serving on active duty (AD) or active duty for training (ADT) under Title 10, USC, may be assigned as acting commanders of AA training units during annual training (AT). This includes authority under the UCMJ, unless withheld by competent authority. Installation commanders implementing the authority granted by this paragraph will ensure that— (1) Paragraphs 3–3 and 3–4 are followed. 2) Reserve components (RC) organizations have adequately trained their commanders according to the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM) and AR 27–10. (3) RC commanders receive orientation regarding the administration of military justice at the installation and the unit level. (4) Necessary attachment orders, direction of the President authority, assumption of acting command letter, administrative measures, and appeal channels are accomplished. (5) Staff or command judge advocates monitor the fair and just administration of military justice. . Active guard reserve personnel. The AGR personnel may be assigned duties (for example, serve as company commanders of AA units in USAREC) that: (1) Support operations or missions assigned in whole or in part to RCs. (2) Support operations or missions performed or to be performed by a unit composed of elements from more than one component of the same armed force; or a joint forces unit that includes one or more RC units; or a member of a RC whose RC assignment is in a position in an element of the joint forces unit. 3) Advise the Secretary of Defense, the Secretaries of the military departments, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the commanders of the unified combatant command regarding RC matters. 2–6. Specialty immaterial commands The senior officer regularly assigned and present for duty with logistical commands (or communication zone headquarters, sections, and areas) and similar specialty immaterial commands will assume command of the organization. This provision applies unless the senior officer is ineligible under paras 2–15 or 2–16. ) 2–7. Designation of junior in the same grade to command The DCS, G–1 is responsible for policy on the designation of junior in the same grade to command. a. When two or more commissioned officers of the same grade, both of whom are eligible to command, are assigned to duty in the same command or organization, the President may assign the command of forces without regard to seniority by DOR. b.

General officers are authorized to announce by direction of the President, the designation of one of several officers of the same grade within a command under their jurisdiction as a commander thereof. (1) This refers to general officers commanding ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs, armies, corps, installations, divisions, separate brigades, regional support commands (RSCs), General Officer Commands (GOCOMs), and heads of DA staff agencies. This may be done without regard to relative seniority. (See paras 2–5 and 2–8 for policy on general officers. When an officer who is junior by DOR is designated to command, a memorandum will be used to announce the appointment and will contain the information shown in figure 2–2. (2) This appointment is used only if the duties of the position require exercising command. It is not used to assign a junior officer to a staff position that requires supervising and controlling activities of an officer senior by DOR. In staff supervisory positions, commanders make such appointments merely by designation in a memorandum. . Commanders will not use the Presidential authority cited in this paragraph to appoint a junior member as their own successor, either temporarily or permanently. In some cases, a commander having authority under this paragraph may find it necessary to place a junior member in his or her position temporarily as acting commander. If so, a request stating the circumstances and asking for the appointment to be made will be sent to the next higher commander having authority under this paragraph.

The next higher commander will review the request and make the appointment deemed necessary. Commanders will not issue a blanket designation without prior approval from the ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commander, and, in cases involving general officers, General Officer Management Office, Chief of Staff (DACS–GOM), 200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0200. Each designation of a junior to a command position requires a separate action by the appropriate authority except when prior approval of a blanket designation has been authorized. d.

The authority in this paragraph will not be used to assign command functions to chaplains or, unless authorized by the SA or his or her appointee, to officers of the AMEDD except as in paragraph 2–16. AR 600–20 • 18 March 2008 13 e. Commanders and their staffs, at all levels of command, are responsible for ensuring proper delegation of authority to NCOs by their seniors. This policy applies whether the senior is an officer, WO, or another NCO. 2–8. Death, disability, retirement, reassignment, or absence of the commander a. Commander of Army element. 1) If a commander of an Army element, other than a commander of a headquarters and headquarters element, dies, becomes disabled, retires, is reassigned, or is temporarily absent, the senior regularly assigned United States Army Soldier will assume command. (2) If the commander of a headquarters and headquarters element dies, becomes disabled, retires, is reassigned, or is temporarily absent, the senior regularly assigned United States Army Soldier of the particular headquarters and headquarters element who performs duties within the element will assume command.

For example, if a division headquarters and headquarters company commander is temporarily absent, the executive officer as the senior regularly assigned Army Soldier who performs duties within the headquarters company would assume command and not the division commander. (3) Senior regularly assigned United States Army Soldier refers (in order of priority) to officers, WOs, cadets, NCOs, specialists, or privates present for duty unless they are ineligible under paragraphs 2–15 or 2–16. He or she assumes command until relieved by proper authority except as provided in c, below.

Assumption of command under these conditions is announced per paragraph 2–5. However, the announcement will indicate assumption as acting commander unless designated as permanent by the proper authority. It is not necessary to rescind the announcement designating an acting commander to assume duties of the commander “during the temporary absence of the regularly assigned commander” if the announcement gives the time element involved. A rescinding announcement is required if the temporary assumption of command is for an indefinite period. b. Head of DA Staff agency.

On the death, disability, or temporary absence of a head of a DA Staff agency, the next senior United States Army officer on duty in the office will become head until relieved by proper authority. (Exceptions may be ordered or required. ) This does not apply to The Surgeon General (TSG) and the Chief, National Guard Bureau (CNGB). Functions of TSG are assumed by the next senior AMEDD officer. Functions of the NGB are assumed by the senior officer of the ARNGUS or the Air National Guard of the United States on duty in the Bureau. (See Section 10505(d), Title 10, United States Code (10 USC 10505(d))). . Commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs. A commander of a ACOM, ASCC, or DRU may continue to discharge the functions of command while absent from the limits thereof, if— (1) Such absence is for a short period only. (2) The commander has reasonable communication with the ACOM, ASCC, or DRU headquarters. (3) The absence is not caused by physical disability. d. General officers. (1) During the temporary absence of the regularly assigned commander, ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs are authorized to assign general officers under their command to positions of command. 2) Where more than one ACOM, ASCC, or DRU is represented on an installation, the line of succession of command may pass from one ACOM, ASCC, or DRU to another. The major Army commanders concerned should agree to the terms of such an arrangement by a MOU and should publish necessary documentation. General Officer Management Office, Chief of Staff (DACS–GOM), 200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0200 will be notified of the action taken. 2–9. Absence or disability of all officers of a unit

On death, disability, or absence of all officers of a unit normally commanded by an officer, the appropriate commander of the next higher command permanently assigns an officer to command, preferably of the branch to which the unit belongs. Pending assignment and arrival of the new commander, the senior WO, cadet, NCO, specialist, or private regularly assigned to the unit will exercise temporary command. Restrictions on assuming command in paragraphs 2–15 and 2–16 apply. Assumption of command will be as noted in paragraph 2–8. 2–10. Emergency command

The senior officer, WO, cadet, NCO, specialist, or private among troops at the scene of an emergency will assume temporary command and control of the Soldiers present. These provisions also apply to troops separated from their parent units under battlefield conditions. The senior person eligible for command, whether officer or enlisted, within a prisoner of war camp or among a group of pri

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