Lung Cancer Detection Methods

There are several ways in which lung cancer may be detected and some of these are the following:

First of all is to have the patient undergo what is technically referred to as “screening” (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.). Here, a series of laboratory tests and other examinations are carried out (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.).

Second is known as blood test (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.). Here, the blood is placed under scrutiny to see if the “lung cancer” has multiplied and have already reached the patient’s liver or bones (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.).

Third is the “bone marrow biopsy” wherein a needle is utilized to take out a small portion of the bone located at the “back of the hip bone” and is placed under the “microscope” to see if any cancer cells may be detected (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.).

Fourth is technically referred to as “mediastinoscopy” (Harvard University, 2008, n.p.). Here, the neck is incised to allow a lighted pipe to go through and to eventually get a sample of tissue inside it (Harvard University, 2008, n.p.) Again, this will confirm if cancer cells are there or not by looking at it under the microscope (Harvard University, 2008, n.p).

Fifth is known as “bronchoscopy” (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.). Like the aforementioned fourth detection method, a lighted pipe is involved here as well (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.). However, with this method, the tube will be inserted on the nose and will look for tumors or obstructions in the lungs (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.). It may also take tissue samples or fluids so that it may be checked under the microscope for cancer cells’ presence (The Health Alliance, 2006, n.p.).

Last but not least is technically referred to as “needle biopsy” (Radiological Society of North America Inc., 2008, n.p.). Here, the lungs are monitored through a machine known as “CT Scan” while a needle is utilized to take out a mass sample in the lungs (Radiological Society of North America Inc., 2008, n.p.).Like in the other methods, the aforementioned sample will have to be checked under the microscope (Radiological Society of North America Inc., 2008, n.p.).

References

Harvard University. (2008). Mediastinoscopy.

Retrieved February 14, 2008 from

http://www.health.harvard.edu/diagnostic-tests/mediastinoscopy.htm

Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (2008). Needle Biopsy of Lung (Chest) Nodules.

Retrieved February 14, 2008 from

http://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=nlungbiop&bhcp=1

The Health Alliance. (2006). Lung Cancer Detection.

Retrieved February 14, 2008 from

http://www.health-alliance.com/Cancer/lung/detection.html