Public Presentations Chapter 5-9

T/F: The first step in speechmaking is choosing a topic for your speech.
True
T/F: Outside the classroom, the topic of a speech is usually determined by the occasion, the audience, and the speaker’s qualifications.
True
T/F: It is usually a poor idea to choose a speech topic that requires research.
False
We will write a custom essay sample on
Public Presentations Chapter 5-9
or any similar topic only for you
Order now
T/F: You should usually avoid drawing on your personal knowledge or experience when choosing a speech topic.
False
T/F: You should usually avoid choosing speech topics that you feel strongly about.
False
T/F: Brainstorming is a method of generating ideas for a speech through free association of words and ideas.
True
T/F: Once you choose the central idea of your speech, the next step is to formulate your general purpose.
False
T/F: The difference between informing and persuading is like the difference between teaching and advocating.
True
T/F: When your general purpose is to inform, you act as an advocate or an opponent.
False
T/F: “To inform my audience of the major steps in responding to a medical emergency” is an example of an effective specific purpose statement for an informative speech.
True
T/F: It is important to keep your audience in mind as you formulate the specific purpose for your speech.
True
T/F: “To inform my audience about golf” is an example of an effective specific purpose statement for a speech.
False
When the general purpose of your speech is to __________ , you act primarily as a teacher or lecturer.
inform
When the general purpose of your speech is to __________ , you act primarily as an advocate.
persuade
“To inform my audience about the history of the Super Bowl” is an example of a
specific purpose
Identify the flaw in the following specific purpose statement for a classroom speech: “To inform my audience about the stock market.”
It’s too general
Charity’s specific purpose statement for her freshmen classroom informative speech is “To inform my audience about the changes in your Medicare benefits for next year.” According to your textbook, are there any flaws in Charity’s specific purpose?
Yes. Charity’s specific purpose statement is not relevant to her audience.
The central idea of a speech should be:
• written as a complete sentence.
• expressed as a statement, not a question.
• devoid of figurative language.
• all of the above.
All of the above
Explain the differences between informing and persuading as general speech purposes.
Informing – telling the audience about a subject
Persuading – convincing the audience to think a certain way
Why is determining the specific purpose such a vital step in the process of preparing a speech?
Indicates what your speech seeks to achieve
Your textbook provides five tips for writing specific purpose statements. What are they?
Meet assignment?
Accomplish in time allotted?
Relevant to audience?
Too trivial for audience?
Too technical for audience?
T/F: Being audience-centered means that your primary purpose as a speaker is to gain a desired response from the audience.
True
T/F: The aim of successful speechmaking is to gain a desired response from listeners by any means necessary.
False
T/F: You are most likely to be successful in your classroom speeches if you think of your classmates as a real audience.
True
T/F: An audience’s response to a message is invariably colored by its perception of the speaker.
True
T/F: Unlike beginning speakers, experienced speakers have little need for audience analysis.
False
T/F: Although most of the process of audience adaptation occurs as part of preparing a speech, a speaker may still need to adapt her or his remarks to the audience during the presentation of the speech.
True
T/F: Even when listeners pay close attention, they don’t always process a speaker’s message exactly as the speaker intended.
True
T/F: Egocentrism means that audiences typically approach speeches by asking “Why is this important for me?”
True
T/F: Stereotyping is an effective way to use demographic audience analysis in a speech.
False
T/F: A public speaker can safely assume that all members of a religious denomination share the same beliefs and values.
False
T/F: Audience size, the physical setting for the speech, and the audience’s disposition toward the topic, the speaker, and the occasion are all elements of situational audience analysis.
True
Audience analysis is an important factor in which of the following?
• selecting a topic
• organizing the speech
• choosing supporting materials
• all of the above
• a and c only
all of the above
In her speech introduction, Kailyn asked, “Have you ever looked through old family photo albums and laughed at what people were wearing? Like many of you, I’ve noticed the changes in fashion and feared that my effort to look stylish today may eventually be a source of amusement to my future children.” According to your textbook, by attempting to show her listeners why they should care about her topic, Kailyn was:
adapting to her audience
The fact that audiences are egocentric means that
• listeners interpret what you say on the basis of what they know and believe.
• listeners believe that their cultural group is superior to all other groups.
• listeners interpret the speech through the speaker’s frame of reference.
• all of the above.
• a and c only.
listeners interpret what you say on the basis of what they know and believe.
According to your textbook, which of the following is a demographic characteristic of a speech audience?
cultural background
Creating an oversimplified image of a particular group of people or assuming that all members of the group are alike is called:
stereotyping
If you were giving a persuasive speech on Medicare to members of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the most important factor to consider when analyzing your audience would probably be the:
age of the audience
What does it mean to say that a public speaker should be “audience-centered”? At what stages in speech preparation should a speaker be concerned about being audience-centered?
A speaker should analyze the audience to determine the content, language usage and listener expectations.
Briefly explain the following statement: “To step outside your own frame of reference and see things from another person’s point of view is a real achievement. Yet this is exactly what you must learn to do if you are to become a successful speaker.”
To be successful, you have to expand your perspectives and see from other people’s point of view.
Explain the following statement: “Every speech situation contains two messages—the one sent by the speaker and the one received by the audience.”
The speaker doesn’t necessarily send the same message the audience receives.
T/F: Using your own knowledge and experience in a speech can help bring the speech to life.
True
T/F: According to your textbook, you should avoid using personal experience when writing a speech.
False
T/F: In you’re unsure where to find a source or a particular piece of information in the library, your textbook recommends that you ask a librarian for help.
True
T/F: Most library catalogues allow a researcher to look for books by author, title, subject, or keyword.
True
T/F: As your textbook explains, academic databases are particularly useful for finding articles in scholarly journals.
True
T/F: Experts advise that you use Internet research to supplement, not to replace, library research.
True
T/F: As your textbook explains, when using an Internet search engine, the more general your search terms, the more productive your search will be.
False
T/F: Like magazine and journal articles, most documents posted on the Internet have been subjected to close editorial review.
False
T/F: According to your textbook, the three major criteria against which to test documents located on the Internet are authorship, sponsorship, and recency.
True
T/F: If you can’t find the date on which a Web document was created or last modified, you are better off looking for a different source.
True
T/F: When taking research notes, it is important to distinguish among direct quotations, paraphrases, and your own ideas.
True
The __________ contains a list of all the resources owned by the library.
catalogue
A(n) __________ is a summary of a magazine or research article, written by someone other than the original author.
abstract
Which of the following does your textbook recommend as ways to help narrow a Google search to make it more effective?
• Develop a strategy to search for specific terms you want to find.
• Type specific questions into the search box.
• Explore specialized Google resources such as news, books, and scholar.
• all of the above
• a and c only
a and c only
According to your textbook, the three criteria for judging the reliability of research documents located on the Internet are authorship, sponsorship, and
recency
As explained in your textbook, which of the following should lead you to question the objectivity of a sponsoring organization for an Internet document?
• The organization has a history of bias and inaccuracy.
• The organization benefits financially by promoting its stance on the issue.
• The organization often expresses controversial opinions.
• all of the above
• a and b only
a and b only
You have found statistics on the Internet that you would like to use in your speech. Before you do, you need to make sure that
a., they come from a credible author or sponsoring organization.
b. you can find the date on which they were published, posted, or updated.
c. the statistics are recent enough to make them reliable for your speech.
d. all of the above.
e. b and c only.
all of the above
Explain what Wikipedia is, how reliable its articles are, and how it should best be used when conducting research for a speech.
Online encyclopedia, good for a basic overview, should be used to find other citations
Identify and explain the three criteria discussed in your textbook for assessing the soundness of documents found on the Internet.
authorship, sponsorship, recency
Your textbook describes six steps an interviewer should take during a research interview to help make the interview process go smoothly. Identify and explain four of them.
T/F: The three basic types of supporting materials discussed in your textbook are examples, statistics, and testimony.
True
T/F: Research has shown that examples have little effect on listeners’ beliefs and actions.
False
T/F: Examples are particularly useful in taking ideas that might otherwise seem vague, impersonal, or lifeless and making them specific, personal, and lively.
True
T/F: A hypothetical example describes an imaginary or fictitious situation.
True
T/F: Hypothetical examples can be especially powerful as supporting materials when they create scenarios that involve the audience.
True
T/F: Examples are an excellent way to personalize a speech because they put abstract facts and figures into vivid, human terms.
True
T/F: The mean—popularly called the average—is determined by summing all the items in a group and dividing by the number of items.
True
T/F: The median is determined by summing all the items in a group and dividing by the number of items.
False
T/F: The major advantage of statistics is that they give your ideas numerical precision.
True
T/F: Acceptable testimony can include either statements from recognized experts or from ordinary people with special expertise on the topic.
True
T/F: Peer testimony is valuable because it gives a more personal and emotional viewpoint than can be gained from expert testimony.
True
T/F: It is seldom necessary to name the people you quote or paraphrase in a speech.
False
Which of the following is recommended by your textbook for using hypothetical examples?
• Follow them with statistics or testimony to show that they are not atypical.
• Make them as brief as possible so you won’t lose your audience’s attention.
• Use them only in the introduction of your speech rather than in the body.
• all of the above
• b and c only
all of the above
As your textbook explains, examples help a speaker
• reinforce ideas.
• personalize ideas.
• clarify ideas.
• all of the above.
• b and c only.
all of the above
Research indicates that the impact of examples is greatly enhanced when they are combined with __________ that show(s) the examples to be typical.
• analogies
• causal reasoning
• credibility statements
• emotional appeals
• statistics
statistics
Jeff began his speech by saying: “Imagine that you are on a deserted island—palm trees sway in the breeze, the warm sun is on your face, and the smell of tropical flowers is in the air. Suddenly, the sound of distant drums breaks your euphoria. What do you do—panic? What would you do if you found yourself in such a situation?”
What kind of supporting material did Jeff use in his introduction?
hypothetical example
Lucy wanted to know what percentage of students plan to attend graduate or professional school after college, so she distributed a survey in three of her classes. Based on the results, Lucy concluded that nearly a third of college students plan to continue their education further. What is wrong with the way Lucy used the statistics from her survey?
Lucy’s sample isn’t representative of college students as a whole.
According to your textbook, when evaluating statistics you should ask whether they
• are from a reliable source.
• use statistical measures correctly.
• are representative of what they claim to measure.
• all of the above.
• b and c only.
all of the above
Explain the differences among the mean, the median, and the mode as statistical measures.
Mean – average
Median – middle of data set
Mode – most often
Identify and explain the four major guidelines discussed in your textbook for using testimony effectively in a speech.
1. Quote or paraphrase accurately.
2. Use testimony from qualified sources.
3. Use testimony from unbiased sources.
4. Identify the people you quote or paraphrase.
What are the three major types of supporting materials used in public speeches?
Give an example of how you would use each.
statistics, examples, testimony
percentages, real situations, personal experience
T/F: Audiences find well-organized speakers to be more credible than poorly organized speakers
True
T/F: Research suggests that using a clear, specific method of speech organization can enhance your ability to deliver a speech fluently.
True
T/F: Most speeches should contain from two to five main points.
True
The fact that audiences are egocentric means that
• listeners interpret what you say on the basis of what they know and believe.
• listeners believe that their cultural group is superior to all other groups.
• listeners interpret the speech through the speaker’s frame of reference.
• all of the above.
• a and c only.
listeners interpret what you say on the basis of what they know and believe.
T/F: The most effective order for the main points of a speech depends upon the topic, the specific purpose, and the audience.
True
T/F: A public speaker should avoid using transitions and internal summaries together.
False
T/F: The topical pattern of organization divides the topic of the speech into logical and consistent subtopics.
True
T/F: According to your textbook, the following connective is an example of a signpost: “So, how can we make our roads safer for cyclists?”
True
According to your textbook, how well a speech is organized likely will influence
how clearly the audience understands the speech.
how the audience views the competence of the speaker.
how confident the speaker feels about his or her delivery.
all of the above.
a and b only.
all of the above
The __________ is the longest and most important part of the speech.
body
blueprint
introduction
conclusion
frame
body
According to your textbook, what is the most important reason for limiting the number of main points in a speech?
hard for the audience to keep track of too many points
When the main points of a speech follow a time pattern, they are organized in ___________ order.
chronological
Here are the main points for an informative speech about the process of drying and storing garden herbs.
I. The first step is to rinse the herbs.
II. The second step is to dry the herbs.
III. The third step is to strip the dried leaves.
IV. The fourth step is to store the herbs properly.

These points are arranged in ______ order.

practical
Here are the main points for a speech about the four lobes of the cerebral cortex.
I. The frontal lobe is located in the front of the brain.
II. The parietal lobe is located in the middle of the brain.
III. The temporal lobe is located on the bottom of the brain.
IV. The occipital lobe is located in the back of the brain.
These main points are arranged in __________ order.
spatial
Explain each of the following guidelines for main points in a speech. Why is it important to follow each guideline?
• Limit the number of main points.
• Balance the amount of time devoted to main points.
• Keep main points separate.
– audience doesn’t lose focus
– put same emphasis on each point
– keep from getting confusing
Identify the four kinds of speech connectives explained in your textbook and give an example of each.
– signposts
– transitions
– internal previews
– internal summaries

Custom writing services

×

Hi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one? Check it out